The Female Artist within the Framing Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

  • Farideh Pourgiv Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities and Literature, Shiraz University, Eram Campus, Eram Street 7194684795, Shiraz
  • Sara Ebrahimi Rahmati Department of Foreign Languages and Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities and Literature, Shiraz University, Eram Campus, Eram Street 7194684795, Shiraz
Keywords: framing narrative, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, female artist, Victorian novel

Abstract

Through the use of narrative analysis of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, it is argued in this paper that by introducing a female artist Bronte is posing questions regarding the experiences of the middle class women of the Victorian era, thus showing how much they were allowed to express their desires and emotions. Bronte presents a female artist who is forced to choose between her role as a wife and her role as an artist. The use of a journal in this novel makes it a counterplot in which female maturity is not equated with marriage, but with the heroine’s rejection of her role as a wife, for though Helen’s character develops through her experience in courtship and marriage, it is her flight and rejection of the angel that empowers her to be born as an artist.

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Published
2011-05-04